Jackson Hole to Bozeman Montana and Home Again…

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A few years back my son Brock and I took a day trip to Bozeman Montana to meet some very dear friends from the Rocky Boy Indian Reservation located in Montana.  Donovan Sr, is an Assiniboine Elder who trained me how to make traditional Native American Pipes, (but that is for another blog post) and Uncle Loren.  The short version is we met Donovan Sr. and Uncle Loren (we call him “Uncs”) to pick up some sacred pipe stone and a couple of new pipes, just completed by Donovan Sr., to take back to Jackson Hole to be photographed.  We also picked up some pipe stone for ourselves as well as exchange some pipe stems, ideas, and friendship! The day in Bozeman ended in what we call a “Good Trade” day.

Our trip started early on a Saturday morning, leaving Jackson Hole at around 8:00am.  After getting our coffee and a couple of bagels we hit the road.  When traveling through this part of the country, which is sooo amazing and in a single round trip of about 450 miles one can experience everything the Rockies has to throw at you.  The weather this Fall day was awesome, skies were clear blue and the sun was shining bright, and the temperature was perfect when we left town.   There are a couple mc_04_05_12_05of ways you can make your way to Bozeman from Jackson, one through Yellowstone Park’s south entrance or head through Idaho, back into Montana, north through the very northwest corner of the park and finally past Big Sky Montana as you make your way down the Gallatin River into Bozeman.

From Jackson to Bozeman is about 214 miles (one way) over some of the most beautiful roads you can travel.  We chose to head west over Teton Pass and into Idaho, then north along the west side of the Teton Range. You first travel through beautiful rolling hills where much of the russet potatoes are grown in Idaho, not to mention double row barley (which Anheuser Bush buys for their beer) and after you make a turn east in Ashton Idaho you eventually end up in West Yellowstone.

Welcome to West YellowstoneFor those who are not familiar with Yellowstone Park, there are 4 entrances to the park.  Jackson Hole to the south, Gardiner at the north, the east
entrance which leads to Cody, Wyoming and the west entrance which is West Yellowstone (it’s a town).  Some of you may be familiar with West Yellowstone as some of the premier fly fishing rivers in the world are in the area. The Madison river, the Firehole, Henry’s Fork, the Buffalo, the Gallatin and many more. This is truly Lewis and Clark country.

From West Yellowstone you head north toward Bozeman and you travel though the very northwest part of Yellowstone Park and you quickly pass over the Madison River eventually picking up and following the Gallatin river all the way into Bozemen. One important note here is that you pass right through a part of the park that suffered from the big fire in 1988.  It is awesome to see how nature has recovered.  You pass Big Sky Montana Ski Resort and other beautiful scenery.  This is one of the most beautiful stretches of road to drive at any time of the year.

buffalo1_bozemantripOnce in Bozemen we had our little pow wow with friends, stopped at a few stores and headed home.  When we left Bozeman the clouds had started to gather.  The weather from Jackson to Bozeman had been perfect!  Clear skies, very dry roads, an easy drive.   But things were about to change.  We headed back up the Gallatin to West Yellowstone.  This part of the trip is about 90 miles.  As we pulled into West Yellowstone, Brock said “Dad why
don’t we go home through the park”
. I said sure let’s do it.  It is important to note that this is about 4:45pm MST and it is getting darker.  It is important because this is animal hour in the park.

We entered the park and headed towards the Old Faithful Geyser basin. This part of the trip from West Yellowstone to home in Jackson is about 130 miles. This is when things started to change. We first ran head on into a male buffalo that decided my truck was bigger than he was.  So he mosied off the road and into the pasture that sat along the Madison river.  He was the first of hundreds we were to run into this day of travels through the park. And on top of it, it was starting to rain.  I quickly looked at my temperature gauge and saw that the temp has dropped drastically to 38 degrees.  This was important because at 38 degrees and below it will start to snow if the conditions are right.

fireholebasin1As we got closer to Old Faithful we saw elk, and big herds of buffalo and we drove along the banks of the Madison River, simply awesome.  By the time we got to Old Faithful Geyser Basin the temperature was down to 36 and still raining.  And it was now getting pretty dark.  Clouded skis and looking even darker towards Jackson.  Along this stretch of the road you travel along the banks of the Firehole river for part of the way and it gets it name from all the thermal activity that it passes through.  An amazing sight to see in its own right.

This is a beautiful part of the park and we tried to take some pictures before the light got too low.  Almost everywhere you look you see geysers, fumaroles, steam, hot pools, bubbling mud, trees, animals, – awesome!   We decided to pull over to take a short break and just take in this beautiful truck1valley.  But we did not stay long as the temperature continued to drop and I said to Brock we are about to get snowed on.  But the ferocity of the change was not expected.

We headed south towards home and as we got down the road about 5 miles the temp dropped to around 32 and I said to Brock here it comes.  And come it did!  It did not flurry a bit or start real light – it just started snowing.  Now in this part of the country you will cross the Continental Divide many times.  And we were heading for one of those crossings at an elevation of 8391 feet above sea level.  One other thing to note here – the park was void of people as it was close to closing so we were basically on our own.

The Snow Starts to FallThe snowflakes started to increase in size and the volume at which they fell was speeding up.  The road quickly disappeared and became totally white.  The snow was accumulating at a rate that I estimated at over an 1-2 inches per hour maybe even more at times.  We put the truck into four-wheel drive as we were not going anywhere without it.  Our speed dropped to about 25 miles per hour and we are crawling our way through Yellowstone park in the middle of a snow storm all alone.  When we left Jackson it was sunny and clear.  In Bozeman it was starting to cloud up but still relatively warm.  West Yellowstone it started to rain and now we were surrounded in white.

Continental Divide 8391 Feet

Our final stop before it got real dark and we made the final trek home was the pass where we cross over the Continental Divide.  We stopped and took this last picture here.  We got out of our truck and it was completely quite.  Snow was falling straight down and you could hear it hit the trees, your clothing, the truck.  It was coming down so thick that it would fall right into your mouth.  If you have never experienced the complete quite of the forest and to see snow falling straight down and building up in front of your eyes you have missed one of heaven’s real treats!!

westyellowstonesignThe light faded fast and Brock and I decided that if we did not get moving we may be spending the
night here as the snow was already over a foot deep on the road.  We slowly made our way to the south entrance of the park and as the roads started to clear we made our way home to Jackson.  You actually leave Yellowstone Park and then make your way through parts of Teton National Park before you get into the Jackson area.

This was an amazing day for Brock and I – we spent it together as father and son, we shared lunch with friends and they we got to see God’s hand on our Mother Earth.  We were kissed by her this day and left with a memory I shall never forget!  WE WERE TRULY BLESSED THIS DAY!

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About Timothy Jennings
Based in beautiful Jackson Hole, Wyoming, I have worked in both the Domestic and International markets for most of my adult life. During the past four years the United States has seen a complete change in direction when it comes to accessing health care and obtaining mandated health insurance coverage. I have been an agent selling in the U.S. markets for more than 30 years. Today I work exclusively serving the needs of our International health insurance clients. If you are outbound or inbound to the United States I can help guide you through the process of selecting proper International Cover that is right for your family.

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